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ACSS Editorial Task Force

Seeking Qualified OFAC/Sanctions Officers

Are you a sanctions expert who is passionate about writing?

We are seeking qualified sanctions officers from corporations, government agencies, international organizations, and financial institutions to contribute to ACSS Editorial Taskforce.

Editorial Task Force members are the collective “brain trust” in helping write ACSS editorial content, such as articles for our website –www.sanctionsassociation.org – and our newsletters.

The scope of this volunteer activity is spread throughout the year. The term of service is for one year, potentially renewable. The time commitment is manageable and spread throughout the planning process of our editorial calendar. The Task Force has quarterly conference calls of 60 minutes.

Task Force Qualifications

  • Required: Currently a member of ACSS.
  • Likes to write!
  • Willing to submit one article of approximately 800 words per quarter
  • Help recruit other members of the sanctions community to submit articles or for interviews, or “your words” section of our newsletter

Members of Editorial Task Force

NameJob TitleOrganizationCityEdTF Member since
Alex HainesBarristerOuter Temple ChambersLondonApril 2019
Thomas NollnerIndependent ConsultantChicagoMarch 2019
Scott NancePrincipalLangley Compliance ConsultingWashington, D.C.March 2019
Robert WilliamsIndependent ConsultantNew York CityMay 2020
Daniel MartinPartner – International TradeHFWLondonMay 2020
Miranda HearnSenior AssociateCommodity TradersLondonSept 2020
Amir Fadavi ArdekaniSanctions SpecialistBNP ParibasParisSept 2020

Recent Articles by Editorial Task Force Members

Recent OFAC Settlements with Non-Financial Companies and Lessons Learned

November 4, 2019 By: Thomas Nollner*

A commonly held misconception within the sanctions industry is that Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctions programs only apply to financial institutions. Recent large civil liability settlements between OFAC and several large banking companies support this misconception. As published in the international press, Standard Chartered Bank reached a settlement agreement with OFAC in April 2019 for an apparent violation by paying OFAC $639 million; Societé Génerale S.A. in November 2018 reached a settlement agreement for the same type of apparent violation by paying OFAC $53 million; and J.P. Morgan Chase in October 2018 paid $5 million to OFAC for an apparent violation.

(more…)

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: The Unintended Consequences of Sanctions from a Population Perspective

August 09, 2019 By: Glenda Juliano*, CAMS

The U.S. currently maintains economic sanctions against many countries. Frequently criticized and often viewed as a paradox of U.S. foreign policy, economic sanctions are nevertheless quickly becoming the tool of choice for many countries.  Sanctions are so popular in fact that many states and municipalities within the U.S. have also begun to implement their own sanctions regimes. In 2000, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held in Crosby v. National Foreign Trade Council that a Massachusetts law restricting state transactions with firms doing business in Burma was preempted by federal statute.

(more…)

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