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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: The Unintended Consequences of Sanctions from a Population Perspective

August 09, 2019 By: Glenda Juliano*, CAMS

The U.S. currently maintains economic sanctions against many countries. Frequently criticized and often viewed as a paradox of U.S. foreign policy, economic sanctions are nevertheless quickly becoming the tool of choice for many countries.  Sanctions are so popular in fact that many states and municipalities within the U.S. have also begun to implement their own sanctions regimes. In 2000, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously held in Crosby v. National Foreign Trade Council that a Massachusetts law restricting state transactions with firms doing business in Burma was preempted by federal statute.

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Wake Up To Sanctions

SanctionsAlert.com Summer Sanctions Round Up
September 5, 2018

U.S. Cracks Down on Russia with Global Magnitsky Regulations and New Sanctions

As of June 29,2018, the Global Magnitsky Sanctions Regulations (31 CFR part 583) took effect on the Federal Register. These regulations implement the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act (or U.S. Global Magnitsky Act) as well as Executive Order 13818 of December 20, 2017.

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Wake Up To Sanctions

SanctionsAlert.com Sanctions Round Up
March 27, 2018

North Korea Generates $200 Million in Illicit Revenue and Continues to ‘Flout’ International Law - UN Report Claims

On March 5th, the United Nations (U.N.) Panel of Experts released its Report on North Korea sanctions pursuant to U.N. Security Council Resolution 2345 (2017) (the Report). The 298-page document details numerous examples of efforts by North Korea to evade U.N. sanctions and claims that the country has earned $200 million in 2017 concealing the origin of illicit exports. (more…)

OFAC Shortens New Debt Maturity Periods under Russian Financial and Energy Sectoral Sanctions

By Peter Jeydel on September 29, 2017

OFAC today revised its Ukraine/Russia-related sectoral sanctions directives prohibiting US person dealings in new debt or new equity of listed Russian financial institutions and new debt of listed Russian energy companies (in both cases, these prohibitions continue to apply to the “interests in property” of the listed entities, meaning any entity 50% or more owned by them). OFAC took this step pursuant to a statutory mandate in the Countering Russian Influence in Europe and Eurasia Act of 2017 (CRIEEA). See our advisory on CRIEEA.  The changes made today are as follows (and as expected based on the statutory mandate): (more…)

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